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HTD COURSES

HTD Diagrams (in Adobe Acrobat format)

 

      1.   HTD courses should be set up as indicated on the diagram.  There should be a handler’s post or marker at one end and a set-out point for stock at the other.  Approximately halfway between the handler’s post and the stock set-out point, two obstacles should be set up, one toward either side of the perimeter; the distance from the handler’s post to the first obstacle, and from the first obstacle to the second obstacle, should be approximately equal. 

      2.   Perimeter dimensions for sheep courses should be at least 300’ by 400’. Perimeter dimensions for duck courses should be at least 100’ by 100’.  These are minimums; larger perimeter dimensions are encouraged when possible.  In very large, open-field areas, the course director will indicate the course limits.

      3.   For HTD sheep classes, the distance between the stock set-out point and the handler’s post should be at least 300 ft. (100 yds.).  Distance between obstacles (fetch/drive legs) should be approximately half of the distance between the set-out point and the handler’s post.  These are minimums; longer distances are encouraged when possible.  (Distances of 600 ft. or more between stock set out and handler’s post may have drive legs of 1/3 rather than 1/2 that distance).   

      4.   For ducks, the distance between the stock set-out point and handler’s post is at least 75 ft. Fetch/drive legs on duck courses should be between 50 to 60 ft.

      5.   Panels should be approximately 8 ft. x 4 ft. to 10 ft. x 4 ft. for sheep, 4 ft. x 2 ft. for ducks, with an opening of approximately 12 ft. up to 21 ft. for sheep, 6 ft. up to 8 ft. for ducks.

      6.   The pen should measure approximately 8-12 ft. on each side for sheep, 12-16 ft. on each side for cattle, 4-6 ft. on each side for ducks.  It may not have solid sides. The pen should be placed well toward the center of the course, at least 30 ft. away from any perimeter fence (20 ft. for ducks), and is in the same location for all classes.  The pen shall have a rope of 6 to 10 ft. in length for sheep (4 to 6 ft for ducks) attached to the top of the free end of the gate.  A rope is not required at any level cattle. 

      7.   When set out prior to each entrant’s run, the stock may be held in position by assistants, feed, trained dogs, or use of a drop-pen.

      8.   For HTD III, sheep only, one animal is marked by having a light, easily-removed ribbon fastened around its neck.  The ribbon should be fairly loose on the neck, but not excessively so; it should be clearly visible and should come apart readily with a light tug, e.g. by using easily-torn material such as surveyor’s tape or by using a velcro closure.  As an alternative to the hold and ribbon removal, a sponsor may choose to use a shed instead (an animal or animals is split from the group and briefly held apart from the others).  With groups of three, a single animal is to be shed off, and with groups of more than three, two are to be shed off.  This may be done anywhere within the roughly triangular area formed by handler’s post and the panels.  The use of a shed rather than the hold and ribbon removal must be clearly noted on the sanction application, indicated on the premium list or flyer, and marked on the score sheets.  Judging of the shed shall be as indicated under “Judging HRD and RLF Courses, Sorting Exercise,” below.  

      9.   For cattle in HTD III, a shed is to be used rather than the hold and ribbon removal.  With groups of three, a single animal is to be shed off, and with groups of more than three, two are to be shed off.  This may be done anywhere within the lower 1/2 of the arena (where the handler’s post is located), and the fence may be used in accomplishing this.

      10. For ducks in HTD III, a shed is to be used rather than the hold and ribbon removal. With groups of three, a single animal is to be shed off, and with groups of more than three, two are to be shed off.  This may be done anywhere within the roughly triangular area formed by handler’s post and the panels.  As an alternative to the shed, a “duck touch” may be used instead, at the discretion of the judge and sponsor.  The use of a “duck touch” instead of a shed must be announced at the handler’s meeting prior to the class and must be used by all entrants in the class.  For the duck touch, the requirements are the same as for the hold and ribbon removal, except that the handler should reach down and gently touch any duck on the back, NOT the head or neck.

      11. Course time for smaller courses is 10 minutes for HTD I and II, 12 minutes for HTD III.  Larger courses may be given longer time limits, with a slight difference between HTD I/II and HTD III (this should be noted on the sanction form).  Time starts upon the dog leaving the handler’s post and is stopped upon the closing of the pen in HTD I and II, the removal of the ribbon in HTD III.

      12. Point schedule:

Outrun/lift      20          

Fetch      20

Wear/Drive Through lst Panel      15

Wear/Drive Through 2nd Panel       15

Wear/Drive To Pen      10

Pen       10

Ribbon pull/shed (level 3 only)      10

Ties are broken by the best fetch score, followed by best pen score, then time.

 

 

HTD I

      1.   For the HTD I class, the handler may have the dog on lead while positioning it. The dog is positioned approximately even with the level of the panels (it may be further back, but no closer) and approximately in the center of the space between the two sets of panels.  The handler may remain with the dog, or may leave the dog and take a position at any point on the course between the dog and the stock, but must stop short at least 15 ft. from the stock.

      2.   There must be a pause after the lead is removed, before the dog is sent to gather the stock. The handler shall signal the dog to begin the outrun, using any combination of voice, whistle, or move-ment.  The outrun may be performed in either direction. When the dog reaches a position of balance with the stock, it may pause or briefly stop.  The dog then fetches the stock to the handler’s post.  The handler may return to the post during the outrun, or may accompany the stock during the fetch.  Flanking and/or stop commands may be given as needed to bring the stock successfully to the post.

      3.   Once the stock have reached the post, the handler should stand at the post while the stock are taken around the post. The stock should go to the right of the post if the first wear/drive panel is on the left, or vice versa.  Stock are considered to have passed the post when they have crossed the line behind the post that would be a continuation of a line running lengthwise down the center of the arena from the set-out area to the handler’s post. 

      4.   When the stock have passed the handler’s post, the handler may leave the post and accompany the stock and dog to the obstacles, which should be taken in the designated order.       

      5.   The handler may take any position relative to the stock and dog, except that the handler should not go through the obstacles.  If one or all of the stock pass an obstacle closely without going through, they should continue on to the next obstacle.  Upon negotiating the second obstacle, the stock are taken to the pen.

      6.   In penning, after opening the gate the handler may move about and may assist the dog as needed, and need not hold the rope. The stock should be completely inside the pen before the gate is closed.  The gate should not be slammed.

 

HTD II

      1.   The handler removes the lead just inside the limits of the course and brings the dog off lead to the handler’s post.  The handler may remain with the dog, or may take a position anywhere on the half of the course between the post and the line of the obstacles, not passing beyond the obstacles during the outrun, lift and fetch.

      2.   The handler sends the dog to gather the stock (the outrun may be done in either direction). When the dog reaches a position of balance with the stock, it may pause or briefly stop.  The dog then fetches the stock to the handler’s post.  If not already at the post, the handler returns to the post ahead of the stock and dog, and stands there while the dog moves the stock past the post (see number 3 above for definition of passing the post).  The stock should go to the right of the post if the first wear/drive panel is on the left, or vice versa.  The handler may then leave the post and direct the dog to take the stock to the first obstacle.

      3.   As the stock are taken to the first obstacle, the handler may accompany the dog and stock, taking any position relative to them.  Upon reaching the first obstacle, the handler may not go through or past the obstacle.  While directing the dog to move the stock toward and through the second obstacle, the handler must remain behind an imaginary handler’s line which runs from the handler’s post to the edge of the first obstacle nearest the center of the arena.  The handler may remain near the first obstacle or may move back toward the handler’s post so long as this line is not crossed before the stock have cleared the second obstacle.  If one or all of the stock pass an obstacle closely without going through, they should continue on to the next obstacle. Once the stock have cleared the second obstacle, the handler proceeds to the pen.

      4.   In penning, after opening the gate the handler must hold the end of the rope attached to the gate.  The handler cannot release the rope during penning, but may move about within its limits and may assist the dog.  With cattle, the handler need not hold the rope.  The stock should be completely inside the pen before the gate is closed. The gate should not be slammed.

 

HTD III

      1.   The handler removes the lead just inside the limits of the course and brings the dog off lead to the handler’s post.  The handler stands at the post while the dog is sent to gather the stock.  After the outrun, lift and fetch, the dog moves the stock around the handler’s post.  The stock should go to the right of the post if the first wear/drive panel is on the left, or vice versa.

      2.   The dog drives the stock toward and through the first obstacle, then cross-drives toward and through the second obstacle.  If one or all of the stock pass an obstacle closely without going through, they should continue on to the next obstacle.  The handler remains at the post until the completion of the second obstacle.  When the second obstacle has been negotiated, the handler may go to the pen.

      3.   In penning, after opening the gate the handler must hold the end of the rope attached to the gate.  The handler cannot leave the gate or release the rope during penning, and should only assist the dog in penning through whistle, verbal or hand commands.  With cattle, the handler need not hold the rope.  Any handler who physically assists the dog in penning will have points deducted.  The gate should not be shut until all the animals are completely inside the pen.  The gate should not be slammed.

      4.   After penning, the animals should be removed from the pen and the gate closed.  The dog should then hold the sheep to the handler so that an easily-removed ribbon may be taken gently from the neck of the marked sheep.  This may be done anywhere within the roughly triangular area formed by handler’s post and the panels.  The ribbon may not be taken as the stock are leaving the pen, nor may the exercise be done near an exhaust gate.  Animals may not be held by hand or crook.  Once the ribbon is removed, the run is over.